Les routes orientales du papier

Paper first appeared in China in the 2nd century BC, and it was massively diffused from the 2nd century AD onwards. Paper making techniques evolved significantly during the first centuries of our era. The new material was used for various purposes, and it progressively replaced wood tablets, bamboo tablets, and eventually silk as a support for writing. Paper was exported to neighbouring countries, such as the kingdom of Silla on the Korean peninsula, Japan, Vietnam, and later Tibet and India. These regions soon started producing their own paper. In the West, paper progressed more slowly, but it eventually reached Europe via the Islamic world.

Related Information

  • Authors:
    Jean-Pierre Drège
    Era:
    2nd century BC to 15th century AD
    Language of article:
    French
    Source:

    Buddhist Route Expedition. International Seminar for UNESCO Integral Study of the Silk Roads: Roads of Dialogue. 21-30 September 1995. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Format:
    PDF
    Countries:
    China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Egypt, India, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Republic of Korea, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam

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